Taher Asad-Bakhtiari | TEFAF 2019
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TEFAF

About his “Recovered Barrels,” Asad-Bakhtiari explains, “Cleaned and all spruced up, the finished products are a cross between recycled art, environmental art, and upcycle. Each one is unique in style and color and continue to be multi-functional. Rescued from a fate of total destruction, the barrels tell a story of diversion, barter, overcoming resistance, metamorphosis, and recovery. As such, they stand as a testament to Iran’s modern and torturous history: from riches to dust, from shiny new to battered and barely surviving, from frivolity to austerity and then slow re-conversion…. [they] stand as a subtle reminder that in a city of extremes, it is the simple things that tell the biggest stories.”

Regarding his “Tribal Weaves,” Asad-Bakhtiari states, “My tenuous yet deep-rooted connection with the Bakhtiari tribe motivates me to support this dying craft, and I draw inspiration from their unique artistic legacy… Kilims were true raw expressions of a tribe’s outlook on beauty. With the demise of tribal life, that type of art has died. What has not is the technique, and I believe the survival of this craft goes through reinvention.” For his kilim and the gabbeh pieces, Asad-Bakhtiari takes the fundamentals of the historical technique, stripping them down to reveal the lace-like texture of the underlying warp, as well as enhancing the traditional geometric shapes, emphasizing the design but also the uniqueness of the medium.